R.I.P Jane Eccles

I’ve never liked February, but this one was worst than most and it was hard to ignore the creeping feeling of despair that grew as the days passed. Then, just as I thought the worst was over, I learned that my friend Jane had died.

jane02

It wasn’t a complete shock. She had been suffering from secondary cancer for many years, but had survived against the odds for so long, a small part of me began to believe that she was indestructible. If only.

I first met her at Waterstone’s in Richmond when I became a bookseller, 28 years ago. She was a freelance illustrator who worked part-time and for the next five years, we must have spent thousands of hours in each other’s company, sharing jokes, baring our souls and bickering like an old couple.

Work relationships are strange things. They can seem like a very close friendships (or a deep animosity), but once people leave their shared environment, the intense feelings often seem to vanish into thin air, leaving a polite awkwardness.

That never happened with Jane and although we only met a few times in recent years, the rapport was unaltered.

At one point, we even shared the same therapist. I was feeling rather glum after a close relative was killed in a car crash and Jane said that I should see a woman in Kew called Isabel, who had studied with Freud’s daughter. The idea of being only two steps away from the great man himself appealed, so I decided to give it ago.

Isabel was a lovely woman, but had never quite grasped the concept of professional detachment and once invited the two of us round for tea and cakes, which was both nice and strange at the same time. Neither of us were quite sure how effective the theraputic aspect was, but the experience was not to be missed.

In addition to sharing therapists (just writing that makes me shudder with embarrassment), Jane was also my wife’s landlady for a while, so the three of us developed a bond that remained strong.

As a friend observed, Jane was a quiet person but had a remarkably strong personality. She had very particular likes and dislikes, with a large vocabulary of nicknames for things. A snack was always a ‘snackerel’ and if anyone dared to use the word ‘portion’ in her presence, she would hiss like a cat.

She had a rather eccentric approach to running her cookery section in Waterstone’s. I remember that she always ordered three copies of The Cranks Recipe Book. It used to arrive, go on the shelf and sell out within 24 hours. We would then have to wait a week or two for the next delivery of three copies. When I dared to suggest that it might be an idea to order 15 or more,  I received a hissing cat noise in response.

But while Jane may not have qualified for the Bookseller of the Year award, she was an excellent illustrator whose work was in great demand. She studied at the Chelsea School of Art in the late 1970s and developed a commercial style that echoed Quentin Blake, but was instantly recognisable as Jane Eccles to anyone that knew her work.

Here are some examples of her art:

14046098_10209457911939939_5930582141904360392_n14079602_10209443720305157_7209994653571934376_n14233048_10209513130360365_1967017944424569113_n12717527_10207813153622009_5414678112365294744_n14947437_10210128876793641_5841297180560563715_n14600895_10210037848958002_4293878722863047468_n14610917_10209925117859795_8213937292839880793_n14690987_10209907891229140_8547699505501784221_n

Jane could have probably enjoyed greater recognition, but she was never pushy and couldn’t take the corporate world seriously. Like the best people, she cared about the things that really mattered and thought that the world of corporate strategies and brand values was all rather silly.

When Jane discovered that she had cancer, her only child had recently started at secondary school. Jane was determined to see him grow up and did everything that her doctors advised, enduring a gruelling regime of treatment without any self-pity or protest.

She appeared to beat the cancer, but sadly it returned and Jane was told that her condition was terminal. At that point, we all thought that she would never get to see her son go to university, but Jane suprised us all and lived for several years longer than expected. More importantly, she enjoyed a suprisingly active and healthy life for much of that time and was able to be there for her son when he started out as an undergraduate.

I had very little idea of what secondary breast cancer was and what made it different from normal breast cancer, but this short film of Jane’s explains it perfectly.

I feel terribly sorry for Jane’s son and husband. I also feel very sorry for her father, who has now outlived two of his three children. I tried to think of something positive or comforting to say on their cards, but was lost for words.

Jane was one of the most extraordinary people I’ve ever met: kind, gentle and generous, with a loveable eccentricity and a wicked sense of humour. She loved her family, friends and pets and that love was easily reciprocated.

The world will be a poorer place without her.

1936522_10208081049279233_8515515903976929554_n

14 comments

  1. Erika

    There never really are sufficient or apt enough words for deep loss and it stymies me every time, so I’m often left wordless. A lovely remembrance. Cyberhugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Steerforth

      There are quite a few books on Amazon that are illustrated by her, but I couldn’t recommend one in particular; perhaps the Bumper Book of Silly Jokes? She had a long relationship with Macmillan which she really valued, apart from the times they asked her to illustrate sex education books – she loathed having to do cartoons of people’s bits.

      Like

  2. Dale

    Remember the good times – that’s all we can do. Remember those people that it was a privilege to know. And make the most of them while they are still this side of the Divide.
    I know that bird at the top, it’s a New Zealand kakapo. Dopy things (but enchanting), which we are struggling to conserve, as there are fewer than 100 of them left.

    Like

  3. Pete

    Love the illustrations – especially the church. (And your point about work friendships – most stop so abruptly, alas.) This is a fine tribute. My condolences.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s